Ring Setting

The ring setting, also known as the mounting, is the part of the ring that holds the diamond in place (usually done in platinum or gold).


barBar Setting A bar ring setting uses circular bands of thin metal to hold the stones in place. Each bar has a stone on either side of it. Similar to a channel setting, except every two stones share a bar in between them.
bezelBezel Setting A bezel ring setting holds the stone in place using a thin band of metal to surround the diamond at the middle, either completely or partially surrounding the stone. It can be straight or scalloped at the edges, and provides good protection for the middle and bottom parts of the stone.
channelChannel Setting A channel ring setting holds the stone in place at the sides with no metal between it. It protects small stones better than a prong setting will, and will be less likely to get caught or snagged on objects. This is perhaps one of the more popular settings for wedding bands or anniversary bands.
invisibleInvisible Setting An invisible ring setting holds diamonds closely together and is concealed underneath the stone. It is a very nice way to increase the amount of light entering the stone and show off its brilliance.
prongProng Setting A prong ring setting holds the diamond by at least three thin, finger-like, metal prongs that are attached to the bezel and bent over the edges of the stone to hold it in place. Also known as a claw setting, the prong setting is the most commonly used style for solitaire engagement rings.
pavePave Setting Similar to an invisible setting, the pave ring setting is when the diamonds are fit into small holes and set level with the surface of the ring itself. All of the stones are set as close to one another as possible, so the piece of jewelry literally looks as if it’s been paved with stones.
tiffanyTiffany Setting A Tiffany ring setting has 4 or 6 claw-like prongs and allows the most light to enter the diamond from all angles. It was developed by Tiffany & Co. in 1886.